Tag: australia

Image: 9to5google.com

With the Turnbull government already under pressure to ban Huawei from participating in the roll out of the 5G network, security agencies are also examining the decisions around ZTE, which is China’s second biggest telco equipment manufacturer.

The US government this week blocked any company from supplying the Chinese manufacturer. This now includes Google who not only supply the operating system for the their phones but the suite of apps that are most popular on it in western markets.

The sanction comes after ZTE previously sold telecommunications hardware to both Iran and North Korea, violating the US’ trade laws and beginning a large investigation into the company’s practices.

The US has already banned Huawei from providing hardware that would provider infrastructure to domestic telecommunications networks for security reasons and Australia has been strongly advised to do the same,  the Turnbull government remaining tight lipped & sitting on the fence over the issue.

The same will now be asked of ZTE. Presently the company provides a great deal of low-cost, rebranded phones sold by Telstra & Optus in Australia and could see the telco’s left trying to find another manufacturer if a sanction is imposed.

Source: Chinese telco ZTE on Australian spy agencies radar after UK, US bans | afr.com

According to the TIO’s report, for the period of July to December last year, there were 22,827 complaints related to the NBN, a 203.9% increase in complaints for the same period in 2016.

A total of 14,055 of these complaints were related to the quality of service on the NBN, and 8.757 complaints were related to the installation of the NBN

NBN CCO Brad Whitcomb has refuted the report stating that despite the larger number of complaints less than 1% of people with an NBN connection have lodged complaints. He also claims that the majority of complaints lie with the ISPs and not the underlying NBN itself, with just 5% of lodged complaints ending up on their table.

Anecdotally I don’t know a single person that hasn’t complained about their NBN connection myself, but then how many regular folk are likely to walk about town praising their internet connection?

Source: Thousands Of People Have Complained About Their NBN Service

The new 2018 QLED TV evolves the premium viewing experience, with big screens and vibrant colours for truly lifelike pictures. Manage your connected devices conveniently with a single remote, find a world of content easily, and delight in designs that blend effortlessly into your home’s interior.

The new QLED models are Samsung’s “crème de la crème” when it comes to TVs. The new sets make use of the company’s “Quantum Dot” technology and come with a 10 year “no screen burn” guarantee.

They also feature the much advertised “Ambient Mode” that blends the TV into its surroundings by mimicking the wall behind it and displaying widgets on its screen when not in use.

Pricing released today has the new models ranging from A$3,699 for the Q7 55″ up to $10,499 for the Q9 75″.

Q9F 75″ – $10,499 (QLED)
Q9F 65″ – $6,999 (QLED)

Q8F 65″ – $5,899 (QLED)
Q8F 55″ – $4,099 (QLED)

Q7F 75″ – $8,199 (QLED)
Q7F 65″ – $5,299 (QLED)
Q7F 55″ -$3,699 (QLED)

Source: The new 2018 Samsung QLED TV. See nothing else. | Samsung Australia

In addition to a AU$69 modem, Kogan Internet’s month-to-month NBN plans start at AU$58.90 per month for the 12/1Mbps speed tier; AU$68.90 per month — currently discounted to AU$58.90 per month for the first 24 months — for 50/20Mbps speeds; and AU$88.90 per month for speeds of 100/40Mbps.

The service is being carried by Vodafone meaning whether you’re a customer of Kogan or Voda you’ll get the exact same speed and congestion on both.

Interestingly, Voda, who’s plans also offer unlimited data, are more expensive across the board. The biggest difference comes at the top speed tier costing $99/month on Voda and $88.90 with Kogan.

Source: Kogan NBN service goes live | ZDNet

Australian shoppers would have to pay a $5 tax on every parcel posted from overseas under a federal government plan to cover skyrocketing security screening costs.

Parcels containing purchases like clothing, makeup and books worth less than $1000 – which now represent 90 per cent of deliveries entering Australia – would attract the new tax.

This is in addition to forcing online vendors based overseas to begin collecting GST from July 1st.

It’s estimated nearly 38 million parcels came into the country last year that fit the government’s criteria. That’s a cool A$190m in the back pocket for doing sweet F-A.

Don’t piss in our pockets about “skyrocketing security screening costs” this is just more fear mongering by Mr Potato Head and his mates – the proposal coming from the Department of Home Affairs, led by Peter Dutton.

Source: Department of Home Affairs plans new tax on parcels being posted to Australia

The newly elected South Australia premier, the Liberal Steven Marshall, has made his first promise – his government intends to kill the Tesla plan for the world’s biggest “virtual power plant” that would install batteries in low income households for no cost.

Not like a newly elected Liberal government to roll-back a forward thinking plan cough NBN cough now is it?

Source: Marshall’s first promise as SA premier: Kill Tesla battery plan : RenewEconomy

PAX Aus and EB Expo, the biggest gaming shows in the southern hemisphere, are teaming up to create the ultimate celebration of games and gaming culture at PAX Aus 2018.

This partnership will bring the world-class features of EB Expo to PAX Aus and include a dedicated area for the biggest game publishers to showcase upcoming titles, developer presentations, and Australia’s biggest pop-up EB Games store.

Like a “vanishing twin” absorbed in the womb… ewwwwww.

I guess that means no more Krusty Demons motor cross action then? I actually would’ve liked to have seen one of them fly over Polly Woodside.

On the upside it means that there’ll no longer be a split and show goers can see everything at one place. For instance Activision and Call of Duty have generally favoured EB Expo but they’ll now be a part of EB’s new sub-seciton (presumably) of PAX Aus.

Two Bureau of Meteorology employees are being investigated by the Australian Federal Police (AFP) for allegedly running an elaborate operation involving the use of the bureau’s powerful computers to “mine” cryptocurrencies…

Entire IT team herded into a conference room by the AFP during a raid held yesterday.

Two staff members were then extensively questioned however no charges have been laid as the investigation continues.

The BoM make use of some of the most highly powered computer systems in the country for predicting weather patterns. Their intense computational output make them a cryptominer’s dream – especially when you’re not footing their power bill!

Source: Police question Bureau of Meteorology staff over cryptocurrency operation – ABC News (Australian Broadcasting Corporation)

Due to hit 1,000 buildings in two years, the network is currently attempting to offer services to 40 buildings, with another 140 to follow thereafter, the City of Adelaide said in a statement on Monday.

In it’s continued “FU” to the federal government’s mess known as the NBN South Australia has connected their first building to it’s new “Ten Gigabit” network.

The rollout is being handled by TPG, who were in the throws of building an extensive fibre network of their own in many capital cities before the NBN came along and told them “stop”.

Source: Adelaide 10Gbps fibre network begins building connections | ZDNet

Under the proposed Australian law, ISPs are simply required to be more transparent about what consumers can expect with a specific plan. Rather than advertising only the maximum speeds, they would have to include typical speeds for the average user, indicate busy periods, and clearly list any other factors that might impact service.

Bring it!

And good on Australia for having the balls to lead the charge on this one. ISP advertising is a blatant scam.

Source: Australia Is Considering Making It Illegal for ISPs to Advertise Inflated Speeds – Motherboard