Inside Vertu

Vlad Savov at The Verge:

What if you could use all the best materials and most expensive manufacturing processes, what sort of phone would you end up with? Given free reign to experiment within the then-resplendent Nokia, Vertu gradually evolved into its own division, with a name, logo, and brand identity that grew to be synonymous with overt demonstrations of wealth.

I’m no fan of Vertu but you can’t help but admire the craftsmanship & attention to detail that goes into making one of these phones.

Perhaps what I dislike about Vertu is encapsulated best in this quote:

The central tenet of Vertu design also remains unaltered. “If you want to stand out, that’s what it was built for,” says Hutch Hutchinson, the company’s chief of design, as he points to the $15,000 Signature handset. It’s an unapologetic luxury item, one which turns its Nokia Series 40 software and anachronistic number pad into an asset, demonstrating through them that the owner of the phone doesn’t need modern technology, he most likely has people doing those jobs for him.

A phone for people who want to flaunt that they have underlings.

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